Asset Productivity Articles

Our expert staff is well known throughout the industry for its breadth of knowledge gained through years of practical experience. The following articles, written by members of our staff, have been published in industry journals and Web sites.

Headeer

  • What NASCAR Can Teach Your Operators and the Maintenance Department

    By Robert Glancy, Asset Management Technician, Life Cycle Engineering

    One of the greatest tools any maintenance person can rely on is the equipment operator. As an asset management technician, I create equipment maintenance plans based on FMEAs. I can look at the possible failures of a piece of equipment and tell if we need to create predictive maintenance (PdM) or inspection tasks to prolong its life cycle.

    read more...

  • Creating Maintenance Training Programs for Operators

    Although some maintenance activities require formal classroom training, many routine tasks can be taught to equipment operators internally using manufacturers’ instruction manuals and in-house subject matter expertise.

    read more...

  • Effective Tracking of Operations, Maintenance and Reliability Improvement

    read more...

  • The Best Changeover is No Changeover

    In a perfect manufacturing world, one would be able to dedicate production assets to one product, run that product continuously, and never, ever be forced to change to another product. If one could do so, this mode of operation would yield true world-class performance. Think of it–no constant struggle to reduce the losses that invariably occur as part of the changeover process.

    read more...

  • Involve Your Operators in Every Daily Maintenance Plan

    read more...

  • Eight Steps to Include in Your Assessment Process

    If you’re planning a continuous improvement initiative, it’s a good idea to begin by capturing an accurate picture of your current state of operations and comparing that picture to what best practices look like. You need the right information to develop a prioritized roadmap to close performance gaps and a business case that assures cost-effective implementation, sustainability and maximum benefits. And you need a process to follow to maximize the effectiveness of the assessment itself.

    read more...

  • Three Ways to Measure Success of a Continuous Improvement Initiative

    The ability to measure success of a continuous improvement initiative is critical to the overall success of the project. From a change management perspective, projects are more likely to be successful when executive sponsors are visible and active. For executive sponsors to take on this active role they need to understand the value the initiative is bringing to the organization. If the value is great, then precious resources will be allocated to the project at the expense of other competing initiatives. Quantitative and qualitative measures of the initiative’s value can be combined to determine a measurement of success.

    read more...

  • Make Sure Your Metrics Help You Reach Your Goal

    Everyone loves to be identified as a top performer. In power generation, our plants strive for increased availability and reduced forced outages. We measure performance indicators (metrics), report them to the Generating Availability Data System (GADS) and benchmark ourselves against similarly designed power plants. And just when we think we are sitting pretty, we deal with new performance indicators such as Equivalent Forced Outage Rate – Demand (EFORd) which measures forced outage for power demand periods, not just a 24-hour clock.

    read more...

  • What Really Makes Reliability Excellence Possible?

    Many organizations struggle with poorly performing personnel and physical assets. Operators not operating and maintaining the assets properly, or maintenance personnel not performing adequate maintenance, lock these organizations into a frustrating, reactive environment. This environment perpetuates performance problems that lead to higher operating costs as well. Organizations in this mode are looking for answers, but not always in the right places. Many desire to achieve Reliability Excellence, but underestimate or take the wrong approach to achieve that goal.

    read more...

  • Changing from a Task-based PM Program to a CBM Program

    Since the dawn of the mechanical revolution, companies have been searching for ways to manufacture more for less. In the past 20+ years companies have shifted from the “more is better” concept to “how can we be more profitable with what we have?” How can we reduce costly downtime losses and increase the profitability of the manufactured product?

    read more...

  • Who Will Do Your Next Shutdown?

    read more...

  • Hidden Leaders of the Shutdown

    If your organization uses contract labor to conduct shutdown repairs, you know this is true: once the shutdown team takes over, the responsibilities of your maintenance crew members change. Jobs transform. An electrician might become a gang leader, contractor liaison, tour guide or safety officer. For this brief period the maintenance worker joins management. They help manage the thousands of shutdown details. Are you preparing maintenance workers to be effective in these roles?

    read more...

  • What Drives Asset Life Cycle Costs?

    When questioned about their operations, too many executives believe that maintenance is the primary, if not sole, driver behind chronic reliability problems, high capital replacement costs and the excessively high life cycle costs of their physical plant. They point to variances in maintenance budgets, excessive downtime and a myriad of other factors that on the surface appear to be the result of the ineffective maintenance. But in most cases, a closer look reveals a completely different story.

    read more...

  • Why Don’t You Have a Tool Crib?

    One of the many MRO best practices we look for at our client sites is the existence of a tool crib designed to effectively and efficiently store, control and maintain specialty items such as bolt cutters, shop vacs, sawzalls and other power tools, generators, fans, and pipe threaders. These are often one-of-a-kind and sometimes expensive items that aren’t required frequently, but when they are, they need to be available and ready for use. 

    read more...

  • Supervision 101 – The Fundamentals

    Imagine you’re on a walk through your plant. What you see is far from a structured use of management fundamentals by your supervisor. Boards that include production requirements are incomplete or not filled out at all. Quality issues are evident. You notice considerable idle time -- employees are standing around waiting for something. The supervisor is nowhere to be found and you wait patiently. Sure enough, a few minutes later the supervisor shows up on a forklift with a pallet of parts.

    read more...

  • What Constitutes a Kit?

    We often get asked what all is included in a kit, and specifically if a kit should be created for a job that only requires one part, such as a filter or belt. The short answer is yes!

    read more...

  • Is Your Shutdown Planning Hurting Your Routine Corrective Planning?

    As a maintenance planner and master planner over the last 30 years I have had the opportunity to visit a number of manufacturing facilities (most of them producing chemicals) in order to share planning and scheduling ideas and techniques. Almost all the facilities I visited had something in common: they devoted large amounts of resources to planning of one particular sort – shutdown planning. While these facilities paid careful attention to detail when performing maintenance planning for outages (more often than not due to regulatory governmental requirements), for the most part they did a relatively poor job of planning routine corrective jobs, with the notable exception of preventive maintenance activities.

    read more...

  • What’s wrong with my EAM system?

    If your car (or your loved one’s car) wasn’t running properly you would get it checked out, right? If it wasn’t getting the expected miles per gallon, the gas gauge wasn’t working properly and the vehicle was leaving oil marks on your driveway, you would be pretty frustrated. And for safety’s sake you would do something about it right away.

    read more...

  • Four Reliability and Maintenance Projects That Provide Immediate Results

    Ask any industry practitioner about the duration and effort required to embed maintenance and reliability best practices into an organization and the answer will likely be consistent: it is not a short-term endeavor and the effort is substantial. So why write an article about initiatives that provide immediate results with minimal investment? 

    read more...

  • Developing Asset Management Plans

    Asset management plans form the cornerstone of an effective asset management system. The recently released ISO 55000 series of standards for asset management clearly defines the importance of asset management plans: they provide the roadmap for achieving value from physical assets by optimizing cost, risk and performance across the asset lifecycle.

    read more...