Asset Productivity Articles

  • Corrective Action for ISO 55000

    How to drive continual improvement through an impactful Corrective Action program

    At its core, the Corrective Action (CA) process addresses issues or gaps that have been identified, develops a complete action plan to address those issues or gaps, and resolves them completely and verifiably. The CA process should be rigorous, consistent, repeatable, and accommodate a wide range of uses. Using a methodical approach, a CA process:

  • Is it Time for an After-Action Review of your Business Continuity Management Plan?

    As I write this article we are in the early stages of economic recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic. Business leaders are asking “What can we do to recover?” and “What can we do to be better prepared in the future?” While the events of the last few months are still fresh in our minds we need to conduct after action reviews.

  • Asset Management Strategy: Creating a Business Case for Change

    Asset-intensive organizations like manufacturing plants, industrial facilities, and public utilities depend on strong management of physical assets to reliably meet operational and financial goals. To implement an asset management strategy that will produce predictable, reliable, and sustainable results means the organization clearly understands how and where to make the best investments in its asset management system. These investments include designing for reliability and better reliability and maintenance work processes throughout the asset life cycle as well as training people at all levels of the organization.

  • Five Actions to Win Your Bean Counter’s Approval

    If leading business experts, publications and websites are any indication, you know how critical innovative thinking is to your company’s future. But you may also feel frustrated with the approval process at your firm. You may have failed to get approval for great ideas in the past and that is negatively impacting your desire to propose new ideas in the future. 

  • Asset Management Strategy: Leading Through Observation

    Asset-intensive organizations like manufacturing plants, industrial facilities and public utilities depend on strong management of physical assets to reliably meet operational and financial goals. Implementing an asset management strategy and system that will produce sustainable results clearly requires executive-level sponsorship. In organizational change leadership terms this translates to being an active and visible leader. So what does that mean for asset-intensive organizations seeking to improve their asset management strategies?

  • Why Your Facility Needs an Asset Management Strategy

    Asset-intensive organizations like manufacturing plants, industrial facilities and public utilities depend on excellent management of physical assets to reliably meet operational and financial goals. Many owners confuse a capital asset replacement plan (a reactive and costly strategy) with an asset management strategy that proactively reduces cost and risks while extending and maximizing the useful life of the assets

  • Internal Audit for ISO 55000

    When looking at the tremendous scale of an asset management implementation, it’s easy to push off some of the “smaller” clauses like 9.2 Internal Audit. In doing so, an organization overlooks a valuable method for gauging project progress and for educating affected personnel about asset management and the ISO standard.

  • Enterprise Transformation: The CIO’s Roadmap to Operational Excellence

    Enterprise transformation, disruptive technology, predictive analytics, Internet of Things, enterprise visibility...As the CIO of a transportation organization you’re faced with enough technology buzzwords to make your head spin. From transit passengers to front-line maintenance workers, the stakeholders that matter to your organization demand easier access to better information.

  • Reliability Centered Maintenance: 40 Years Young and as Relevant as Ever

    Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) is turning 40, but it isn’t “over the hill.” In fact, RCM is just as relevant and strong an approach today as it was when Nowlan and Heap published “Reliability Centered Maintenance” in 1978.

  • Changing Company Culture: It’s a Matter of Principles

    If I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard a client say, “We’ve got to change the culture!” I would be a wealthy man.

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