Life Cycle Engineering Success Stories

  • LCE’s Logistics Team Helps Update Part Supply Data for Mission-Critical Systems

    The Naval Surface Warfare Center Philadelphia Division (NSWCPD) provides research, development, test and evaluation, acquisition support, engineering, systems integration, in-service engineering and fleet support.

  • LCE Helps U.S. Navy Modernize Surface Ships

    As NAVSEA’s Deputy Commander for Surface Warfare, SEA 21 is the dedicated life cycle management organization for the Navy's in-service surface ships. It is responsible for managing critical modernization, maintenance, training and inactivation programs. SEA 21 serves as the primary technical interface for surface ships, ensuring they are modernized with the latest technologies and remain mission relevant throughout each ship's service life.

  • "MRO Optimization Project" Gets Chemical Manufacturer Ready for OSHA Audit

    After experiencing a major accident, a worldwide manufacturer of specialty chemical products was audited by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) which specified actions the plant needed to implement. OSHA noted that the facility did not have a program in place to ensure the appropriate parts were being used to repair or replace the intended piece of equipment.

  • Investing in Reliability Pays off for Commercial Bakery

    Business keeps on rising for one of the leading suppliers of frozen bakery products to the food service industry. Larger than five football fields, the highly automated, state-of-the-art facility has four production lines that make frozen bread dough, ready-to-eat flatbreads, and frozen cookie dough.

  • By Finding and Fixing the Right Problem, LCE SEA Coaches Help Navy Sailors Learn New Skills and Save Maintenance Dollars

    The engineering department of the U.S. Navy’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Maintenance Center (MARMC) directly supports Fleet and Type Commanders with waterfront technical and logistics services and maintenance training associated with the installation, operation, maintenance, and readiness of shipboard equipment and systems. The engineering group’s mission is to design, build, deliver and maintain ships and systems on time and on budget for the U.S. Navy. They are the leaders of the ship repair industry in all aspects of ship maintenance.

  • Total Systems Approach Reduces Cost for Navy Ships

    The Commander, Naval Surface Forces is responsible for manning, training, equipping, and maintaining all U.S. Navy Surface ships. Keeping ships, destroyers and amphibious squadrons in satisfactory operating condition is a massive effort made more challenging by limited funding available for ship maintenance and repair. Life Cycle Engineering supported NSWC Philadelphia in their effort to provide a more effective approach to diesel engine life cycle management.

  • Managing Part Inventory

    The Carrier Network, Navigation and Steering Controls Branch of the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division (NSWCPD), also known as Code 525, provides in-service engineering for ship navigation systems and integrated bridge control systems. They also provide waterfront planning, development, implementation, execution, maintenance and upgrading support.

  • LCE’s SEA Coaches Keep the Fleet Mission Ready

    In the early 1980s, the U.S. Navy began development of a new mine countermeasures (MCM) force, which included two new classes of ships and minesweeping helicopters. The vital importance of the state-of-the-art mine countermeasures force was strongly underscored in the Persian Gulf during the eight years of the Iran-Iraq war, and in Operations Desert shield and Desert Storm in 1990 and 1991 when Avenger and Guardian conducted MCM operations.

  • LCE’s SEA Coaches Keep ACU-4’s LCAC mission ready

    Life Cycle Engineering (LCE) is tasked by NSWC Code 425 with providing On-Site Representation (OSR) to ACU-4. LCE currently has two Shipboard Equipment Assessment (SEA) Coaches assigned to this command.

  • Reliability Program Deployment Helps Global Manufacturer

    A global metals manufacturer needed to take corrective measures to fix their frequent equipment failures from one of their hot mills. The facility realized the issues were beginning to affect their ability to meet customer demand, so they quickly sprang into action and began searching for outside expertise that could help identify the root cause of their equipment failures, develop processes to prevent future downtime, and provide on-site support to oversee the implementation of a new reliability improvement plan.

Share This

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share via email