Life Cycle Engineering Success Stories

  • Accelerating Progress in a Manufacturing Plant’s Reliability Journey

    Improving reliability in an asset-intensive manufacturing plant is often described as a journey because it can take multiple years to drive measurable improvements. In the case of this metal products plant, the reliability journey took some twists and turns, but progress continues.

  • LCE’s SEA Coach to the Rescue: Troubleshooting Get Ship Repairs Back on Schedule

    The mission of COMNAVAIRPAC (Commander Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet) is to support the Pacific Fleet and Unified Commands by providing combat-ready Naval Aviation Forces which are trained, manned, interoperable, maintained and supported. This includes 79 squadrons operating 1,600 aircraft and six aircraft carriers

  • LCE Partners with MTA Long Island Rail Road to Manage Obsolescence

    The M7 railcar vehicle is mid-way through its intended service life. The Obsolescence Management (OM) Program provided LIRR Maintenance of Equipment (MofE) Department with the knowledge, strategy, and processes to prepare for potential obsolescence issues due to the unavailability of parts.  The program was designed to help the railroad become proactive in tracking and reviewing parts for potential obsolescence

  • LCE Partners with MTA Bus Support Fleet Services

    The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Bus Support Fleet Services (SFS) recognized a lack of maturity in their maintenance organization and the need for a more granular approach to managing their diverse fleet of assets and associated inventories. The SFS organization did not include a Maintenance Planner/Scheduler discipline and recognized inefficiencies in the lack of sufficient corrective and preventive maintenance job plans.  

  • LCE Helps New York’s MTA and LIRR Improve Asset Management Across all Track Departments

    Since 1834, Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) has been the busiest operating passenger rail system in North America, with uninterrupted service since 1834. The LIRR network contains over 124 stations, 1,000 passenger cars, 700 miles of track, and serves 80-100 million riders each year. LIRR’s parent organization, New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), is an extremely asset-intensive organization with an asset registry valued in excess of $1.0 trillion. 

  • LCE’s Experts Use Design and Engineering Skills to Redesign Critical Machinery Systems

    Creativity. Talent. Know-how. Experience. Those are descriptors for the type of engineers you want helping to develop and test a working prototype. That’s why Life Cycle Engineering is a preferred partner when it comes to making the jump from a technology design to a working prototype. LCE’s engineering experts solve problems for clients from the U.S. Navy to market-leading manufacturers.

  • LCE Provides Chemicals Corporation with Equipment and Facility Condition Assessment

    Albemarle Corporation is a global specialty chemicals company with leading positions in lithium, bromine, refining catalysts and applied surface treatments. With a history that extends back to 1887, Albemarle is a leading global producer of catalyst solutions and performance chemicals.

  • What’s In a Name? How Storeroom Optimization Eliminated Excess MRO Inventory

    Imagine you’re a maintenance professional in a global manufacturing organization. You need to place a large order for spare parts for your equipment but due to the disarray of your materials storeroom, you have no way of knowing those parts are already in stock. Picture this happening over and over again for many years, driving up the cost of your MRO inventory.

  • LCE Equips Sailors with Diesel Engine Training

    The Propulsion, Power and Auxiliary Machinery Systems Department of the U.S. Navy’s Naval Surface Warfare Center in Philadelphia (NSWCPD) is responsible for all auxiliary systems for surface and undersea vehicle machinery, ship systems, equipment and material

  • An Automotive Company Invests in CMRP Certification To Improve Reliability

    The many benefits of increased reliability are widely understood – improved safety, less downtime, extended asset life. But how does one actually create a culture that values and creates reliability?

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